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OpenAIRE Task Forces

The task forces are a new programme in OpenAIRE Advance to enable capacity building, competencies and awareness raising on different relevant open science topics, involving all partners and NOADs, demonstrating a vertical approach for knowledge exchange. NOADs with more engaged activity levels are involved throughout and are also encouraged to facilitate these groups, aiming to strengthen understanding, steer project activities and, mobilise community ties.

In OpenAIRE Advance there are three task forces (at the bottom of the page you find useful resources (guidelines, blogs, checklists, etc):

  • Policies for Open Access and Open Science
  • Research Data Management
  • Legal Guidelines for Research Performing Organisations (RPOs)
Research Data Management Toolkit

This toolkit includes a number of resources on research data management. However, due to its broad scope, the toolkit is not structured as an online course.It contains courses, videos, infographics, books and other materials

How to make the most of your publications in the humanities?

The workshop jointly organized by FOSTER Plus and DARIAH-EU will focus on domain-specific practices of opening up scholarly communication in Arts and Humanities. Publishing is a relevant topic for each and every researcher regardless on career status or research interest. The workshop aims to draw a picture on the changing landscape of scholarly communication and to help equip researchers at all career stages (focusing on early-career researchers) with the skills they need to excel in this open environment.

To share best practices and generate fruitful discussions on trends, innovations, and present-day challenges in Open Access publishing in the Arts and Humanities, different stakeholder perspectives will be brought together such as representatives of next-generation publishing platforms, research infrastructures, librarians, and researchers from different areas and career stages.

Open Access and the Humanities: A Train the Trainer Perspective

The goal of this ‘train the trainer’ Humanities Open Access event has three parts. First, to set a base level of knowledge and mutual understanding around the topic, the actors, and the tools and methods available. Secondly, to understand the specific challenges to training humanities researchers, as well as the specific issues and challenges faced by humanists. Thirdly, to imagine future collaborations, and a recurring programme of events and activities to enable them. This initiative arises from a collaboration between DARIAH, the Open Library of Humanities (OLH), EIFL, and FOSTER Open Science. It will consist of a series of talks establishing the context for humanities open access, the tools and resources available and their attendant issues, and the platforms and funding models that have the potential to deliver fee free, equitable and gold open access for humanists. Finally, we will end with a question and answer session and a discussion of further activities.

Research Data Management and Sharing

This course will provide learners with an introduction to research data management and sharing. After completing this course, learners will understand the diversity of data and their management needs across the research data lifecycle, be able to identify the components of good data management plans, and be familiar with best practices for working with data including the organization, documentation, and storage and security of data. Learners will also understand the impetus and importance of archiving and sharing data as well as how to assess the trustworthiness of repositories.

 

Guidelines on FAIR Data Management in Horizon 2020

Guidelines to help researchers make their research data findable, accessible, interoperable and reusable (FAIR), to ensure sound managementd. Good research data management is not a goal in itself, but rather the key conduit leading to knowledge discovery and innovation, and to subsequent data and knowledge integration and reuse.

DIY Research Data Management Training Kit for Librarians

Training kit for librarians who wish to gain confidence and understanding of research data management, based on open educational materials, covering five topics:

  • Data management planning
  • Organising & documenting data
  • Data storage & security
  • Ethics & copyright
  • Data sharing

The kit uses the Research Data Mantra online course and selected exercises from the UK Data Archive. It further contains a training schedule, podcasts for short talks, presentation slides, evaluation forms, data curation profiles and reflective writing questions based on the experience of academic librarians who have taken the course.

Data Curation Profiles provide a complete framework for interviewing a researcher in any discipline about their research data and their data management practices.

RDM for librarians

Content for a three-hour introductory RDM session for librarians. The course covers:

  • Research data and RDM
  • Data management planning
  • Data sharing
  • Skills

The materials consist of presentation slides and an accompanying handbook.

Digital Curation 101

Digital Curation 101 employs the curation lifecycle model sections as a means of presenting content to students. The DC 101 has been developed because the DCC, in its role as a source of expert advice and guidance to the community, identified a need for a contextual, theoretical introduction to the basics of digital curation with practical examples and exercises. The target audience is new grant holders with Research Council curation mandates to fulfil. The course indicates what should be considered in planning and implementing projects.

easySHARE

easySHARE is a simplified HRS-adapted dataset for student training, and for researchers who have little experience in quantitative analyses of complex survey data. While the main release of SHARE is stored in more than 100 single data files, easySHARE stores information on all respondents and of all currently released data collection waves in one single dataset. Moreover, for the subset of variables covered in easySHARE, the complexity was considerably reduced. For example the information collected only from one person of a couple or in a household was transferred to all respective respondents; time constant information collected only in the first interview was transferred to all later interviews; the coding of missing values was enriched to provide an easier understanding of the routing and filtering of the interviews; etc. In addition, several ready to analyse variables have been added, such as health indexes, demographic information, or economic measures. When possible measures have been selected or recoded to facilitate comparative analyses with the US Health and Retirement Study (HRS).