Open Science

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OpenAIRE Task Forces

The task forces are a new programme in OpenAIRE Advance to enable capacity building, competencies and awareness raising on different relevant open science topics, involving all partners and NOADs, demonstrating a vertical approach for knowledge exchange. NOADs with more engaged activity levels are involved throughout and are also encouraged to facilitate these groups, aiming to strengthen understanding, steer project activities and, mobilise community ties.

In OpenAIRE Advance there are three task forces (at the bottom of the page you find useful resources (guidelines, blogs, checklists, etc):

  • Policies for Open Access and Open Science
  • Research Data Management
  • Legal Guidelines for Research Performing Organisations (RPOs)
Reproducible Research and Data Analysis

Reproducible research is at the heart of science. There has been an increased need and willingness to open and share research from the data collection right through to the interpretations of results. This has come with its own set of challenges, which include designing workflows that can be adopted by collaborators in a way that does not compromise the integrity of their contribution. This module will introduce the necessary tools required for transparent reporting which is reproducible and readable.

 

Open Research Software and Open Source

Software and technology underpin modern science. There is an increasing demand for more sophisticated open source software, matched by an increasing willingness for researchers to openly collaborate on new tools. These developments come with a specific ethical, legal and economic challenges that impact upon research workflows. This module will introduce the necessary tools required for transforming software into something that can be openly accessed and re-used by others.

Open Research Data

Open research data refers to the publishing the data underpinning scientific research results so that they have no restrictions on their access. Openly sharing data opens it up to inspection and re-use, forms the basis for research verification and reproducibility, and opens up a path to broader collaboration. In this module, you will gain insight into the importance of data sharing for reproducible research and how to curate and share your own research data.

Webinar recordings

Recordings of past webinars organised by the UK Data Service.

DANS Data Game

DANS has developed a game especially for researchers: the DANS Data Game. The game gives an impression of the research data landscape and was specially produced for the 15th anniversary of DANS. The game can also be used in Trainings to engage researchers and start discussions. The game can be ordered online free of charge and will later also be available digitally. 

Personal Data Protection

This section includes information relevant to Personal Data Protection:

Licensing Practice

This section includes information on:

Open Science: Sharing Your Research with the World

Explore ways to apply Open Science principles to academic work - including your own. Learn how to share your research effectively and responsibly, building greater visibility and impact.

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CLARIN Depositing Services

One of the fundamental services of the CLARIN infrastructure is making sure that language resources can be archived and made available to the community in a reliable manner. To help researchers to store their resources (e.g. corpora, lexica, audio and video recordings, annotations, grammars, etc.) in a sustainable way, many of the CLARIN centres offer a depositing service. They are willing to store the resources in their repository and assist with the technical and organisational details. This has a wide range of advantages:

  • Long-term archiving: a storage guarantee can be given for a long period (up to 50 years in some cases)
  • Resources can be cited easily with a persistent identifier.
  • The resources and their metadata will be integrated into the infrastructure, making it possibe to search them efficiently.
  • Password-protected resources can be made available via an institutional login.
  • Once resources are integrated in the CLARIN infrastructure, they can be analyzed and enriched more easily with various linguistic tools (e.g. automated part-of-speech taggingphonetic alignment or audio/video analysis).